FASHION INDUSTRY EXCHANGE AND LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT (FIELD) PROJECT – CLIENT ANNOUNCEMENT

2018 Fashion Industry Exchange and Leadership Development (FIELD) Project

We are excited to announce that this year’s client for the Fashion Industry Exchange and Leadership Development (FIELD) project will be the designer brand, Tonia DeBellis.

Tonia DeBellis is a Canadian womenswear brand that is well-known for its “wear-anywhere-active-wear” collection. The brand focuses on design details and fit to create looks that are feminine and edgy for everyday living.

Fashion Business Management (FBM) students will need to use the accumulated knowledge from the program to assist their client with finding innovative and strategic solutions for their business.

For this year’s case study, the focus is on digital marketing strategies. Students teams are tasked to develop and market a seamless product collection for the Fall 2022 season.

In addition, the marketing strategy will need to attract new customers to the brand, drive traffic to their website and improve their social media engagement.

Now in its 12th year, the FIELD project will provide another opportunity for students to showcase their talents and network with industry professionals. The project has been an important event for students to kickstart their careers in the Fashion industry and land amazing job opportunities after graduation. 

To check out more details about the project, visit our website at https://www.senecafield.ca/ or follow us on Instagram @senecafashion.

#FIELD #SenecaFashion #SenecaProud #FashionBusinessManagement #FBM

Tips for Learning Online

2017 Fashion Industry Exchange and Leadership Development (FIELD) project presentation

Over the course of the last year, there has been a huge shift to online learning, which can be an adjustment from in-person learning. Therefore, in this post I would like to share some tips on how to effectively learn online.

Set your schedule and manage your time

To successfully learn online, self-discipline is crucial. I recommend treating your online courses as an in-person course and attend your lectures as scheduled and prepare for your classes ahead of time. Each week, set out a plan to complete your weekly readings and assignments and stick to it. It is important that you set aside a specific and consistent time each week for lecture and study to make sure you stay on top of your assignments.

Create a regular study space – free of distraction

Since online learning provides the ability to learn anywhere including the comfort of our own home, it becomes increasingly easy to get distracted. Therefore, create a designated study space for yourself that is free from distractions. Just think of the number of times that you pick up your phone or scroll through Instagram and lose your train of thought. Our time is precious and it is important to create an environment where you can stay focused on your lectures and maximize your study time.

Create online study groups

Even though you are learning online, does not mean you can’t create study groups with your peers. Studying together can be an effective way to learn new concepts and it can make online learning more enjoyable. Try setting up regularly meetings with your group to work on assignments and study, which will also help you stay on track.

Reach out for assistance and ask questions

Ask for help. If you have any questions, be sure to reach out to your professors about coursework through email or meet them virtually during their designated office hours. You can also check out Seneca’s Learning Online resource page for more academic support.

Industry Spotlight: Romy Schill, Sheep and Lamb Producer and her view on SDG 2, Zero Hunger

RschillRomy Schill was raised on a dairy farm near Moorefield. She met her husband Ryan Schill through Ontario’s 4-H program and when they married in 2008, they knew that they wanted to farm. Romy had studied at the University of Guelph receiving her degree in Agricultural Science. After Romy worked off the farm for a few years and after getting some farm experience, the couple decided to concentrate on sheep. The barn was rebuilt and set up to handle their new flock.  They now have 300 ewes (female sheep) and hope to increase their herd size to 500 in the coming years. Their farm, in Wellington County, has been in the Schill family for 94 years.

Their sheep are a combination of both commercial and purebred d stock. The sheep are marketed to other farmers for breeding stock or to the local auction ring for meat. They also sell some lamb meat and sheep products (wool, yarn, sheepskins) from the farm gate and at a few farmers markets.

Romy is a board member of the Upper Canada Fibreshed. The Upper Canada Fibreshed is an affiliate, not-for-profit organization within the international Fibershed network committed to building a regional fibre system centered around local fibres, local dyes, and local labour. It nourishes emerging, bioregional textile communities of producers and consumers, that value sustainable agriculture and hyper-local textile manufacturing. Its members believe that supporting bioregional textile networks will change the way we make, purchase and use textiles, envisioning a different culture based on soil-to-soil systems for environmental regeneration.

SDG2When asked her top #SDG, Romy replied “With our farm we truly support sustainable resource use and soil to soil fibre systems to achieve food security, improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture. A huge commitment to animal health, care and environment gives our animals the opportunity to be productive creatures.”

Want more? Visit our blog post ‘not a baa-d look’ and learn about our #SenecaFashion sheep sheering project.

 

Alumni Spotlight: Kinoo Arcentales

This week we explore the talented work of Kinoo Arcentales, #SenecaFashion Graduate

“An Echo in History”

To his surprise, Kinoo Arcentales’ journey into the fashion industry was swift and unexpected. Reflecting on the moment when he decided to pursue fashion, Kinoo said, “I never expected being a designer. It was actually during my studies at Seneca, during the RED: Emerging Designer Showcase, where I first took fashion seriously.”

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Born in Toronto and raised in Quito, Ecuador, Kinoo is a third-generation fashion designer of Kichwa and Mestizo heritage. Following the footsteps of his grandmother, he explains that like her, he built his success from nothing. Today at the age of 25, Kinoo’s talent and wisdom shines beyond his years. He has designed his own collection, AN.D.N,which earned him the 2016 Rowenta Award for ‘Best In Show’ at Redefining Design and is the owner of Pacha Indigenous Art Collection, located in downtown Toronto; recognized for selling hand-made bags, textiles, art and jewelry created in collaboration with Indigenous communities in Canada.

Showcasing his collection AN.D.Nat the the 21st Century Atelier: Redefining Fashion in a New Age of Design, a collaborative event by the Seneca School of Fashion and the Royal Ontario Museum, Kinoo describes the opportunity “as a privilege”. Working with an androgynous theme, Kinoo created AN.D.N for both men and women and designed silhouettes that closely resemble clothing found in Otavalo, Ecuador – his hometown. Showcased at the event was Kinoo’s favourite design – a Navajo poncho wrapped around a black jacket, worn with draped pants and a dark hazel skirt.

 

Kinoo considers fashion as an expression of activism, and strives to transform and transcend the stereotypical perception and image of Indigenous art. His mission is to inspire and encourage the younger generation to embrace their traditions and identity, while at the same time, remain detached from conservative ideals.  “AN.D.Ncan be understood as an approach to a prophecy,” says Kinoo. The logo for his company – Yana Manta, which translates to “I am from the void” – envisions an eagle and condor flying in harmony, signifying the fulfilment of a prophecy that traces back 500 years. “The condor and the eagle represent two separate forces from the south and the north, meeting to revolutionize and create a new culture or rebirth. It’s a sign that all Indigenous communities from around the world will gather together.

 

Speaking on his experience after graduating from the Seneca School of Fashion, Kinoo says, “It turns out the fashion industry is really hard. It’s rewarding and of course you have your five minutes of fame — but what’s more important is not being an echo, but a roar through history. The aftermath is what I’m more concerned with for myself, and what is going to happen five years from now.” In the future, Kinoo wants to continue working with the community and hopes to create a new collection. “I think it’s time to put AN.D.N. to rest. I’m very proud of it, but I think it’s time for it to be put aside and let the next thing take over.”

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When asked what advice he would give to students at the Seneca School of Fashion, Kinoo said, “The fashion industry is bitter-sweet. It’s hard. Work really hard. You have to have a very strong attitude and ethic of work. You can’t go there thinking it’s easy and that I’m going to get a job. If that doesn’t happen, create your own job, create your own position. Build it from something and invest in yourself.”

 

 

Event Students Assist the Aga Khan

School of Fashion Career Networking Night 2018

On Monday, October 1st Seneca’s School of Fashion welcomed 25 companies to the Great Hall. The event was an opportunity for companies and our students to network and learn more about each other. Career opportunities and paths were of special interest to our students and they had the chance to speak with the most knowledgeable of representatives from companies such as Nordstrom, RW & Co, Sephora, Shoppers Drug Mart, Clinique, Holt Renfrew, Footlocker, Elmwood Spa, Rexall, The Ten Spot, HBC & Saks, Sanctuary Day Spa, NYX and more!